[Ebook] ↠ Space Trilogy Author C.S. Lewis – Thepurelynaturalcompany.co.uk

Space Trilogy I would rank this with Tolkien s Middle Earth work for skill in creating imaginary realities Lewis and Tolkien were close friends and often gave each other feedback on drafts of their work and with Stephen King s The Stand for its power as a story of good and evil Also like those other two stories, I would caution that some of this might be no, is too dark for children or young teens.I especially like the portrayal of evil as stupid, blind, and shallow rather than being intriguing, romant I would rank this with Tolkien s Middle Earth work for skill in creating imaginary realities Lewis and Tolkien were close friends and often gave each other feedback on drafts of their work and with Stephen King s The Stand for its power as a story of good and evil Also like those other two stories, I would caution that some of this might be no, is too dark for children or young teens.I especially like the portrayal of evil as stupid, blind, and shallow rather than being intriguing, romantic, or alluring I actually liked this trilogy better than Lewis other and better known Narnia series To ask what these books are about is to open quite the can of worms You might say, Its the story of a man named Ransom, and his adventures with space travel and that Written before the days that man had stepped onto the moon, it was farimaginative often mistaken, but oftener insightful than what modern science fiction allows for It DOES take you on a rather fantastic trip the scenery and creatures in this bemusing speculation of extraterrestial life runs far from the cold littl To ask what these books are about is to open quite the can of worms You might say, Its the story of a man named Ransom, and his adventures with space travel and that Written before the days that man had stepped onto the moon, it was farimaginative often mistaken, but oftener insightful than what modern science fiction allows for It DOES take you on a rather fantastic trip the scenery and creatures in this bemusing speculation of extraterrestial life runs far from the cold little green men assumptions You ll find yourself adrift in a bright spherical universe full of everything from giant talking beaver like creatures to immaterial intelligences But thats not quite right, because its muchthan a thrill ride Its an intricate conversation about the way the universe MIGHT really work, and especially how much larger and fuller it might be than we thought Of course Lewis writes based on the assumption of a CREATED universe which will doubtless throw some people off and with THAT assumption it naturally takes time to explain how gods, angels, even fairies, magic, spirituality and most importantly a supreme diety all fit into the picture There s no sense in denying its a christian work, but as is true Lewis form, the book challenges assumptions and perspectives Anyway thats really not the point because even to say all that you d still be missing the mark There s a spine chilling global conspiracy, in the form of an unstoppable humanist beauracracy which is crashing about england destroying historical colleges, ressurecting wizards, and experimenting on hapless animals and criminals There s sort of a love story, which feels a littlelike an essay on the nature of love and gender and which trancends through the three books but comes to a head via a young unhappy couple in an english college town There s even a heroic bear named Mr Bultitude, seceral reanimated corpses, and well I m sure you can see how difficult it can become Since I can t, therefore, give a sensible explanation of what the book is ABOUT, perhaps I can reccomend the correct audience The first book is a little deceiving because its easy enough to get through There s something light hearted and adventurous about it, though at times the complicated attempts to communicate human ideals with an alien world hint at the trilogy s denseness Make no mistake though, it goes further and deeper, and the last is the furthest and deepest of all Honestly, its a bit of work to get through Its as if Lewis screwed the lid off of everything you thought you might have known about God and the universe and let the speculation run free Sometimes it takes slow and careful reading to untangle, as the books ponder the mysteries of love, space, time and material Thats not to say its not enjoyable Any C.S Lewis reader will recognize his easy tone, and natural way of moving a story along, but it DOES take some effort In other words, this is not tumbling out of a wardrobe into a fun winter s day adventure This is some marraige of essay and story loosely orbiting some of the core ideas that Lewis was constantly adressing I suppose unless you believe in God in some way or form you ll find yourself resenting alot of it, but it is elevated far beyond what we might consider a religious or inspirational work These books are for people who like to think, dont mind unanswerable questions, and aren t looking for something conventional Enjoy Classic Science Fiction Must read for many CS Lewis is best known for his Narnia Series for children and then as a Christian Apologist An agnostic for many years, this English Don and Professor of Literature came to develop a friendship with JRR Tolkien yes, THE JRR Tolkien and over the course of that friendship, converted to Christianity and the Church of England, despite the protestation of Tolkien to a small degree who was himself Roman Catholic Lewis grew in fame throughout England in p Classic Science Fiction Must read for many CS Lewis is best known for his Narnia Series for children and then as a Christian Apologist An agnostic for many years, this English Don and Professor of Literature came to develop a friendship with JRR Tolkien yes, THE JRR Tolkien and over the course of that friendship, converted to Christianity and the Church of England, despite the protestation of Tolkien to a small degree who was himself Roman Catholic Lewis grew in fame throughout England in part due to his writing and in part due to his radio broadcasts known as Fireside Chats which became the basis of one of hisinfluential works, Mere Christianity Why raise this in the context of a review on this Space Trilogy Because it helps to explain the broad appeal of it to many different audiences.Did you enjoy the Narnia Chronicles as a child or an adult reading it to a child Here then is a new vista writtento an adult level with many of the same elements of genius in writing and allegory that you came to love Dive in Reorient yourself to the slightly different genre and prepare to be entertained.Are you attracted to the Christian apologetics of Lewis and less inclined to read for entertainment Well then, how about a rollicking good tale that weaves throughout the telling, major tenets and demonstrations of the heart of Christianity that will feed your mind even as you catch yourself enjoying the story.Are you a Science Fiction fan Does science fiction as it was written before the boom in the 1950 s from authors such as Jules Verne and George Orwell appeal to you Here is some writing in that vein and style that will entertain you Yes there are decided Christian overtones in the work that will challenge you, but the story itself is so well written and the theological underpinning woven into the warp and woof of the tapestry that you will not feel preached at You will enjoy the tale on it s own merits.As to the components of the trilogy you will find that Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra are similar in character Ransom think there may be an allegorical message there is interesting in his role as a Philologist This was probably a tribute to Tolkien the philologist who remained Lewis friend, colleague and a member of the literary circle, The Inkling s who read and critiqued each other s work.That Hideous Strength switches gears a little bit which probably reflects Lewis growing relationship with George MacDonald, also of the Inklings The final book is a little darker andOrwellian but still a very good and thought provoking read.In short there is something for most people here You do not have to be a Christian or even sympathetic to Christianity to read and appreciate these books They stand on their own as classic, strong literature written by a master craftsman If you are attracted to Lewis for his past works and want your literature to have redemptive value to it, then you are in the right neighborhood for that as well.Of all of Lewis works these are probably the least known They are worth the read While Dad is my family s resident sci fi connoisseur, this year Dad and I trekked into interstellar space together, reading C.S Lewis Space Trilogy and Orson Scott Card s Ender s Game I had reservations about reading sci fi novels, as I thought I might end up becoming fluent in Klingon as a result Surprisingly, the genre ended up teaching me a thing or two about theology, and evenabout the mechanics of the writing craft.Written in the 40s, Lewis Space Trilogy has little to do with the While Dad is my family s resident sci fi connoisseur, this year Dad and I trekked into interstellar space together, reading C.S Lewis Space Trilogy and Orson Scott Card s Ender s Game I had reservations about reading sci fi novels, as I thought I might end up becoming fluent in Klingon as a result Surprisingly, the genre ended up teaching me a thing or two about theology, and evenabout the mechanics of the writing craft.Written in the 40s, Lewis Space Trilogy has little to do with the physical world of outer space as we presently know it His writing is clearly informed by the scientific knowledge of his day, but for the most part, the physical world s he writes about serve his stories, which are obviously allegorical Suspend your disbelief, Dear Readers Suspend it in zero gravity.Out of the Silent Planet 1 2 , the first book in the trilogy, features Lewis finding his voice in the genre, and while his first steps are elementary enough, they are also thought provoking and worthwhile While the first two thirds of the book are standard sci fi fare, sometime during the last third, Lewis universe assumes a theological bent that casts life on planet Earth in an entirely different light At the time of this reading, I also listened to N.T Wright s lectures on the Veritas Forum Lewis and Wright pushed outward in my skull, and my inner world expanded as a result My perception of creativity was permanently altered People talk about the narrow mindedness of Christians, which saddens me The imagination of God is clearly broad enough to include, as film director Kevin Smith put it in the disclaimer at the beginning of the movie Dogma, the platypus, among other things If Christ is truly the Son of God, Christians should be the most imaginative lot on the planet.Lewis certainly affirms this in the 2nd book in the series, PerelandraPeople most often associate Lewis with the Chronicles of Narnia, or with hisovert theologically minded works like Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters Little did I know, upon embarking into the world of Perelandra, that I was about to read my new favorite C.S Lewis book, a work so colorful and imaginative and theologically charged that it would win me over completely Lewis dramatizes theology in such a beautiful way in this book, making the abstract concrete, providing us with a new perspective on the human condition through comparison with the inhabitants of another world Among other things, he aims to imagine what it would be like if man had never fallen from grace Lewis works out this theological puzzle with panache in this book, and with remarkably powerful results.The third and final installment in the trilogy, That Hideous Strength 1 2 , was athan worthy conclusion to the series It seamlessly integrates Lewis love of myth with his experiences in the academy, resulting in a work that is highly cerebral, complex, and surreal Structurally, it features Lewis at his most ambitious He adeptly juggles parallel narratives, populates his world with a whole world of memorable characters, and finally interweaves elements of the first two books even as this book feels distinctly unlike them Honestly, it is difficult for me to decide whether I like this or Perelandra better, but I think I like Perelandra better from a conceptual standpoint They both stand tall in Lewis oeuvre.After reading these three books from January to March, I found myself appreciating sci fi as a genre in a way I never had before I cut my teeth on the Star Wars trilogy and grew up watching Star Trek The Next Generation with my Dad, but I only saw them as stories set in space rather than intergalactic parables that had the ability to speak about life here on Earth Not all works of science fiction function this way, but Lewis Space Trilogy certain does Lewis travels into the black abyss of outer space only to turn his telescope back on us so we can see ourselves from a God s eye view Reading with new bookgroup Nov 2015 Because of time, skipped 1, went straight to 2 Perelandra Can be read and enjoyed as sci fi even though one may get lost at the end OR can be read seriously as theological discussion of an alternate Adam Eve story on another world, even though one may get lost at the end nonetheless Really, although I d like to review this very much, it would take too much time I should write myself a paper on it, just for fun Ha Not sure where time for that would c Reading with new bookgroup Nov 2015 Because of time, skipped 1, went straight to 2 Perelandra Can be read and enjoyed as sci fi even though one may get lost at the end OR can be read seriously as theological discussion of an alternate Adam Eve story on another world, even though one may get lost at the end nonetheless Really, although I d like to review this very much, it would take too much time I should write myself a paper on it, just for fun Ha Not sure where time for that would come from But it s really that there s just too much to think about or write about Some thoughts 1 I just don t know how people imagine such things like Lewis imagines the environs and populace of Venus , but I m glad they do 2 Theologically, so much to chew on So much to wonder 3 Finding lots of help understanding this seriesfully by reading Planets in Peril by David Downing It s pretty great 4 Just love Lewis His sense of humor, even when his intellect soars acres above me, still tickles me Read with bookgroup Jan 2011 This trilogy is definitely something different from the most SF books I ve read I was 17 when I read it and it was the first time religious content in book was so overwhelming that I couldn t help but notice it To the day my impression of it could be described as pearly pink bubblegum in the sunset pretty, soft looking but loses the taste fast and becomes sticky and annoying. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here These books remain some of the greatest science fiction ever written I cannot recommend them enough They changed the way that I read books The subtle details, the depth of the characters, the astonishing metaphors It s like seeing yourself illustrated on another planet C.S Lewis is a genius with all of his writing, and this is some of his best A lot of people I know who like the trilogy really had trouble getting into the third one, That Hideous Strength, and couldn t see how it fit in w These books remain some of the greatest science fiction ever written I cannot recommend them enough They changed the way that I read books The subtle details, the depth of the characters, the astonishing metaphors It s like seeing yourself illustrated on another planet C.S Lewis is a genius with all of his writing, and this is some of his best A lot of people I know who like the trilogy really had trouble getting into the third one, That Hideous Strength, and couldn t see how it fit in with the other two Some have gone so far as to say that it doesn t belong in the trilogy I think they are absolutely wrong I love the way that Lewis uses it to tie our planet and our modern day society sometime after the War is all he gives as a time period into the vast scheme of the cosmos Our story matters, because we re part of a greater one And spoiler alert Merlin belongs in this book and in this trilogy, as does any other cultural story that doesn t go away and yet cannot be explained The Cosmic Trilogy Relates The Interplanetary Travels Of Ransom, CS Lewis S Ill Informed And Terrified Victim Who Leaves Earth Much Against His Will And Who, In The First Book Of The Trilogy, Out Of The Silent Planet, Published By The Bodley Head In , Encounters The Imaginary And Delightful World Of Macalandra In The Second Book, Perelandra , Ransom Is Transported To A World Of Sweet Smells And Delicious Tastes, A New Garden Of Eden In Which Is Enacted, With A Difference, The Story Of Temptation That Hideous Strength Completes The Trilogy And Finds Dr Ransom Returned From His Travels In Space And Living In An English University Town Where The Senior Common Room Is Given A Mysterious Depth, A Than Earthly Dimension Which Such Things, In The Author S View, Always Have In LifeCS Lewis Believed That Popular Science Was The New Mythology Of His Age, And In The Cosmic Trilogy He Ransacks The Uncharted Territory Of Space And Makes That Mythology The Medium Of His Spiritual Imagination That Hideous Strength by C.S Lewis Reviewed Analyzed by Oliver Trevor WARNING The following material contains spoilers However, the beauty of this book is that knowing the plot is only half the story The other half is drawing your philosophical conclusions about what C S Lewis was trying to say.That Hideous Strength by C S Lewis is the powerful finale to the Space Trilogy With this book, C S Lewis again challenged the norms of twentieth century theology and philosophy That Hid That Hideous Strength by C.S Lewis Reviewed Analyzed by Oliver Trevor WARNING The following material contains spoilers However, the beauty of this book is that knowing the plot is only half the story The other half is drawing your philosophical conclusions about what C S Lewis was trying to say.That Hideous Strength by C S Lewis is the powerful finale to the Space Trilogy With this book, C S Lewis again challenged the norms of twentieth century theology and philosophy That Hideous Strength beautifully elaborates on the original theme of the first two books morality In the first book, Out of the Silent Planet, the morality of destroying a Martian race in order to save humans was examined In the second book, Perelandra, an immoral god like being attempted to spoil the paradisaical planet Venus Although many of my fellow reviewers on GoodReads focus on being derogatory towards the theology in this book, I think that C S Lewis wrote the theology in That Hideous Strength far better than he wrote the theology in The Chronicles of Narnia Fundamentally, The Chronicles of Narnia was meant to influence young children s minds to be unquestioningly and orthodoxly Christian With the Space Trilogy, which the author aimed at adults with set religious views rather than children with moldable minds, the book deliberately called into question a reader s theological and philosophical views While there is Christianity in the Space Trilogy s world order, C S Lewis also examined the complex, connected, and still relevant principles of religion and morality Like many books by C S Lewis, That Hideous Strength begins with a section on a few ordinary characters who appear to be unrelated to the book One of these ordinary characters was Mark Studdock, husband of Jane Studdock and Fellow of Bracton College in England Mark, from a very early age, was a tag along He saw distinguished circles of individuals and desperately tried to appear as part of their circle For instance, Mark used to eavesdrop on his sister Myrtle when she talked secrets with their neighbor, Pamela While Mark tried to fool himself into believing that he was really interested in Myrtle s secrets, his true longing was to be part of Myrtle and Pamela s inner circle Later on in the book, this character trait nearly cost Mark his morality and his life when he tried to reach the inner circle of a group of immoral, evil plotters When discussing Mark, it is important to note that C S Lewis developed and dynamically changed his characters such as Mark brilliantly Throughout the whole trilogy, the author never outright wrote lists of personality traits for each character Using vivid but short moments from Mark s past, C S Lewis built up a changing character who underwent various changes throughout the book Rather than spending a great deal of time interrupting the main storyline to explain characters, the author cleverly interwove character development with storytelling Much later in the book, C S Lewis spectacularly showed Mark having a mental breakdown With supreme drama, the text showed Mark realizing that his whole life and existence had focused on tagging along behind the big people In a moment, with few words, the author added a whole new dimension to Mark s character.NOTE This quote is a superb example of C S Lewis s dynamic characters The quote is from Mark s mental breakdown.With extraordinary clarity, but with renewed astonishment, he Mark remembered how he had felt about the Progressive Element the group of political campaigners within Mark s college who never really got anything done at Bracton Mark s college when he was first admitted to its confidence he remembered, evenincredulously, how he had felt as a very junior Fellow while he was outside it bent close together in the Common Room, hearing occasional fragments of their whispered conversation, pretending himself the while to be absorbed in a periodical but longing oh, so intensely longing for one of them to cross the room and speak to him And then, after months and months, it had happened He had a picture of himself, the odious little outsider who wanted to be an insider, the infantile gull, drinking in the husky and unimportant confidences, as if he were being admitted to the government of the planet Was there no beginning to his folly Had he been utter fool all through from the very day of his birth Even as a schoolboy, when he had ruined his work and half broken his heart trying to get into a society called Grip, and lost his only real friend in doing so Even as a child, fighting Myrtle Mark s twin sister because she would go and talk secrets with Pamela next door He saw himself as a little boy in short trousers, hidden in the shrubbery beside the paling, to overhear Myrtle s conversation with Pamela, and trying to ignore the fact that it was not at all interesting when overheard He saw himself making believe that he enjoyed those Sunday afternoons with the athletic heroes of Grip while all the time as he now saw he was almost homesick for one of the old walks with Pearson Mark s real childhood friend Pearson whom he had taken such pains to leave behind He saw himself in his teens laboriously reading rubbishy grown up novels and drinking beer when he really enjoyed John Buchan and stone ginger The hours that he spent learning the slang of each new circle that attracted him, the perpetual assumption of interest in things he found dull and of knowledge he did not possess, the almost heroic sacrifice of nearly every person and thing he actually enjoyed, the miserable attempt to pretend that one could enjoy Grip, or the Progressive Element, or the N I C E all this came over him with a kind of heart break When had he ever done what he wanted Mixed with the people whom he liked Or even eaten and drunk what took his fancy The concentrated insipidity of it all filled him with self pity Chapter 11Moving to the setting, Bracton College was a historic but relatively unimportant college in the town of Edgestow, England after World War II The comparatively undistinguished Fellows of Bracton did a great deal of politicking, but most of their political games were entirely pointless or had no real effect.NOTE The following quote demonstrates the spirit of Bracton College letting on to be masters of political intrigue, but in reality having a very slight effect on the college s political state Well, I don t know much about them, said she But in the University Even Bracton itself We all knew it was a horrible College, of course But did they really mean any great harm with all their fussy little intrigues Wasn t itsilly than anything else Och aye, said MacPhee They were only playing themselves Kittens the Fellows of Bracton letting on to be tigers But there was a real tiger about and their play ended by letting her in the plotters mentioned above They ve no cause to complain if when the hunter s after her the real tiger in MacPhee s metaphor he lets them have a bit of lead in their guts too It ll learn them not to keep bad company Chapter 17However, there were two important pieces of information about Bracton The first one was that the political intriguers the Fellows of Bracton formed a group called the Progressive Element, headed by a Fellow named Curry The inner circle of the Progressive Element strongly attracted Mark The second important piece of information about Bracton was that it was ancient According to legend, the great wizard Merlin Ambrosius was buried on the grounds of Bracton With setting and characters made into a dynamic mental picture, the author started the main story of the novel A huge, nefarious, immoral conspiracy called the N I C E National Institute for Coordinated Experiments moved into Edgestow and purchased most of Bracton s grounds The N I C E took criminals from prison and tortured them, while calling this practice humane remedial treatment, brutally dissected live animals, and had its own brutal police force This organization used political intrigue to gain control Unlike Bracton, the N I C E had real power To gain control of Edgestow, the N I C E staged riots Then, they used the press to suggest that the local, non institutional police couldn t cope with the rioting Soon, the N I C E gained the legal authority to put Edgestow under what was essentially martial law The essential goal of the N I C E was to thin down the human race to a few, hardened intellectuals The rest of mankind was deemed recalcitrant and deserving their fate However, the whole malevolent, diabolical N I C E was only a puppet of the devil like Oyarsa 1 of Thulcandra 2 Unfortunately, the only being on Thulcandra at the moment with any experience in saving entire planets was Dr Elwin Ransom By the point in time described by the book, Ransom had returned to Thulcandra and was immortal due to his stay on Perelandra Despite immortality, Ransom was in great pain and could not fight Attracted by the power of the N I C E and not knowing what the N I C E really was, Mark joined the N I C E From then on, he would be killed if he left Eventually, the ultimate battle between good and evil Elwin Ransom s group and the N I C E came down to Merlin Ambrosius The real reason that the N I C E purchased Bracton s land was to find and resurrect Merlin in order to use him as a weapon of mass destruction Luckily, Ransom captured Merlin first Merlin allowed himself to be possessed by the Oyarses1 of the planets and gained ultimate, godly power in order to destroy the N I C E At that point, C S Lewis demonstrated good use of symbolism in a dream.NOTE The following quote is a good example of how C S Lewis used characters dreams for symbolic effect C S Lewis was trying to symbolize how Merlin, not used to omnipotence, was being used up by his godly possessors Will that Merlin man come back here asked Ivy I don t think so, said Jane I don t think either he or the Director Ransom expected him to And then my dream last night It looked as if he Merlin was on fire I don t mean burning, you know, but light all sorts of lights in the most curious colors shooting out of him and running up and down him That was the last thing I saw Merlin standing there like a kind of pillar and all those dreadful things the destruction of Edgestow and the N I C E happening all round him And you could see in his face that he was a man used up to the last drop, if you know what I mean that he d fall to pieces the moment the powers let him go Chapter 17Another important symbol in the book was a newspaper serial story that Mark used to read as a child At the age of ten, Mark abruptly stopped reading it and never looked back He read bad novels that his idols read simply to fit in Decades later, after his mental breakdown, Mark picked up the serial again and read it from start to finish To him, it was better than all the bad novels he read from ten onward.NOTE The following quote shows, in the words of C S Lewis, Mark s change of heart toward his favorite childhood story.Two shelves in the little sitting room were filled with bound volumes of The Strand In one of these, he found a serial children s story which he had begun to read as a child but abandoned because his tenth birthday came when he was halfway through it and he was ashamed to read it after that Now, he chased it from volume to volume till he had finished it It was good The grown up stories to which, after his tenth birthday, he had turned instead of it, now seemed to him, except for Sherlock Holmes, to be rubbish.That quote demonstrated deep symbolism and complex character development The symbolic element was in how the author used a newspaper serial to symbolize Mark s whole life up to a point Also, this quote changed Mark s character greatly The character I dislike most is Fairy Hardcastle She was the head of the N I C E s police, and also enjoyed administering humane remedial treatment 3 Before discussing why Fairy Hardcastle was such a disagreeable person, it is important to understand the perspectives of C S Lewis s time Knowing how readers of the day would interpret a character s behavior is important in order to interpret correctly Fairy Hardcastle C S Lewis, in writing about Miss Hardcastle, was trying to create a rather disgusting character who looked friendly enough on the surface but was evil to the core.NOTE This quote is a good example of C S Lewis using twentieth century perspectives to make an unappealing character While Miss Hardcastle would be considered decent today now that corsets are out of fashion , corsets were the norm in C S Lewis s time In addition, most women didn t smoke in the early 20th century.Mark found himself writhing from the stoker s or carter s hand grip of a big woman in a black, short skirted uniform Despite a bust that would have done credit to a Victorian barmaid, she was rather thickly built than fat and her iron gray hair was cropped short Her face was square, stern, and pale, and her voice deep A smudge of lipstick laid on with violent inattention to the real shape of her mouth was her only concession to fashion, and she rolled or chewed a long black cheroot, unlit, between her teeth As she talked she had a habit of removing this, staring intently at the mixture of lipstick and saliva on its mangled end, and then replacing itfirmly than before She sat down immediately in a chair close to where Mark was standing, flung her right leg over one of the arms, and fixed him with a gaze of cold intimacy Chapter 3In addition to the subjective judgments that can be made about Miss Hardcastle s behavior, she was politically manipulative in a way that would still be considered nasty today She tried to bring Mark into the N I C E an act evil in itself, considering what the N I C E wanted to do by playing on his weakness his tag along nature.NOTE This quote demonstrates Fairy Hardcastle manipulating Mark into the N I C E Later on, she Fairy Hardcastle drifted into police reminiscences In spite of some initial skepticism, Mark was gradually horrified by her assumption that about thirty percent of our murder trials ended by the hanging of an innocent man There were details, too, about the execution shed which had not occurred to him before All this was disagreeable But it was made up for by the deliciously esoteric character of the conversation Several times that day he had been made to feel himself an outsider that feeling completely disappeared while Miss Hardcastle was talking to him He had the sense of getting in Miss Hardcastle sensed Mark s weakness and took advantage of it Miss Hardcastle had apparently lived an exciting life She had been, at different times, a suffragette, a pacifist, and a British Fascist She had been manhandled by the police and imprisoned On the other hand, she had met Prime Ministers, Dictators, and famous film stars all her history was secret history She knew from both ends what a police force could do and what it could not, 4 and there were in her opinion very few things it could not do Specially now, she said Here in the Institute, we re backing the crusade against Red Tape Chapter 3 Fairy Hardcastle was not only manipulative on the personal level, but she also leveraged manipulation of the Press to control the opinions of the population immediately affected by the N I C E Through careful control of newspapers, Miss Hardcastle covers up or belittles the terrible acts of the N I C E police In fact, according to Miss Hardcastle herself, only 2 papers were not under her control, and they would be smashed Since the N I C E was hiring droves of cheap, disagreeable workmen who would undoubtedly upset the peaceful inhabitants of Edgestow, Miss Hardcastle deliberately engineered rioting to prevent the N I C E losing control of the population s collective opinion In the midst of the engineered rioting, Miss Hardcastle presented the N I C E as being a police like force that would help keep the riots under control All in all, Fairy Hardcastle was the most backstabbing she pretended to be Mark s friend in order to gain his support, then left him to fend for himself as soon as he was no longer in favor , manipulative, and vindictive character in the entire book If I could personally speak to Dr Elwin Ransom, the Director of the group fighting the N I C E and the main character of the first two books, I would ask him if he honestly believed that his race was morally worse than the very animals of Malacandra Mars or Perelandra Venus While Ransom, in previous books, acts as if he believes what the Oyarsa of Malacandra tells him that the evil Oyarsa of Earth corrupted humanity and all the other beasts of Earth I wonder about Ransom s real beliefs If he had to make a choice to save the solar system, if he had to destroy Earth or Mars to save all creation, which planet would he pick If Ransom destroyed Earth, the solar system would be rid of evil but he would be killing off his own race If he destroyed Malacandra, a beautiful and old civilization would be annihilated In conclusion, That Hideous Strength is an excellent work of both philosophy and science fiction that questions the reader s ideas FOOTNOTES 1 An Oyarsa plural Oyarses or Oyaresu , in the Space Trilogy world order, was an interplanetary immaterial god like being who ruled a planet All the Oyaresu except the Earthly Oyarsa were good servants of Maleldil the one god of the solar system The Earthly Oyarsa, called the Bent One went rogue in the early days of the solar system Although he was restricted to the Earth due to his evilness, the Bent One spoiled the human race while his good brethren created utopias on their planets.2 Thulcandra is Hressa Hlab or Old Solar the ancient, interplanetary language of the solar system for Earth.3 This treatment consisted of burning people with cigars This treatment was inhumane, didn t remedy anything, and certainly shouldn t have been called medical treatment.4 This book finds ways to make itself relevant even now Police brutality in the book from the N I C E police resembles present day police brutality. Was w re, wenn die christlichen Werte auch im Weltall bei uns fremden Zivilisationen gelten w rden Und was w rde passieren, wenn sie pl tzlich nicht mehr gelten w rden W ren dann alle Zivilisationen bedroht Diesen und vielen anderen Fragen stellt sich C.S Lewis, der Sch pfer Narnias und einer der einflussreichsten christlichen Autoren der Phantastik, in seiner Perelandra Trilogie.Ganz pl tzlich wird der Philologe und Professor Ransom entf hrt Zun chst wei er gar nicht, wie ihm geschieht, d Was w re, wenn die christlichen Werte auch im Weltall bei uns fremden Zivilisationen gelten w rden Und was w rde passieren, wenn sie pl tzlich nicht mehr gelten w rden W ren dann alle Zivilisationen bedroht Diesen und vielen anderen Fragen stellt sich C.S Lewis, der Sch pfer Narnias und einer der einflussreichsten christlichen Autoren der Phantastik, in seiner Perelandra Trilogie.Ganz pl tzlich wird der Philologe und Professor Ransom entf hrt Zun chst wei er gar nicht, wie ihm geschieht, doch dann versteht er, dass er sich auf einem Raumschiff befindet und zu einem fremden Planeten verschleppt wird Nachdem er seinen Entf hrern entkommen konnte, schlie t er Bekanntschaft mit den Ureinwohnern des Mars Schnell muss er aber erkennen, dass er zum Mittelpunkt eines kosmischen Konflikts zwischen Gut und B se wird, der ber das Schicksal vieler Welten entscheiden wird.Mir f llt es sehr schwer, dieses Buch zu rezensieren Ich habe es nach 547 Seiten abgebrochen, und viele der Gr nde, warum ich das tat, haben nicht einmal etwas mit dem Buch an sich zu tun Das Buch ist gut, daran besteht kein Zweifel, in vielerlei Hinsicht auch wegweisend und bedeutend Aber es gab einfach ein paar au erliterarische Entwicklungen in meinem Umfeld in der Zeit, in der ich das Buch las und auf die ich nicht n her eingehen m chte, die mich dazu veranlassten, das Buch beiseite zu legen und vorerst doch bei Lewis Kinderbibel zu bleiben.Wer dieses Buch lesen m chte, sollte sich bewusst sein, dass es sehr bald sehr stark theologische Z ge annehmen wird Das ist keine Wertung, es ist einfach so Da sowohl Lewis als auch sein Protagonist Philologen waren, spielt auch das vor allem zu Beginn eine gro e Rolle Das hat mir pers nlich sehr zugesagt und mir viel Freude beim Lesen bereitet, kann aber andere, weniger linguistisch interessierte Leser vielleicht erm den, so wie mich die Theologie erm dete.Ja, mitunter fand ich es ziemlich anstrengend, seitenweise Diskurse ber den biblischen S ndenfall der Menschheit zu lesen und warum es eben doch nicht gut war, dass Eva vom Apfel nahm Ehrlich gesagt habe ich vieles davon auch berbl ttert.Ziemlich spannend war jedoch der Twist am Ende des ersten Bandes Auf Twitter wurde die Vermutung ge u ert, dass es sich bei Ransom um eine Hommage an Tolkien handelt, was durchaus m glich w re, da der Erz hler des Romans Lewis hei t Au erdem deutet der Autor Lewis im Vorwort zum Dritten an, dass er darin einige Anlehnungen an die damals noch unver ffentlichten Schriften Tolkiens gemacht hatte, die sie sich bei den Inklings gegenseitig vortrugen.Ehrlich gesagt bedauerte ich es sehr, dass vieles so kam, wie es kam, und ich vorl ufig nicht erfahre, was es mit Numinor in der Perelandra Trilogie auf sich hat, aber dieses Buch ist ohnehin eher aufgeschoben als final abgebrochen Vielleicht, wenn einiges wieder besser l uft Fast schon niedlich zu lesen ist, wie sich Lewis den Weltraum und Reisen darin vorstellte Nat rlich aus seiner damaligen Sicht absolut nachzuvollziehen, vielleicht sogar sehr futuristisch F r uns heutzutage wirkt das eher unbedarft, aber, wie ich finde, auch irgendwie niedlich und herzallerliebst.Das Buch ist fast schon eher als theologischer Diskurs im Mantel der Phantastik anzusehen, denn insbesondere die ersten beiden B nde haben vergleichsweise wenig Handlung und daf r umso mehr Dialog Darauf muss man sich einlassen Tut man das aber und hat mehr Gl ck als ich mit dem Umfeld, in dem man das Buch liest , wird man sicher eine Menge daraus mitnehmen k nnen Auch wenn ich es nicht beendet habe, empfehle ich das Buch weiter.Mehr von mir auf meinem Blog


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